Can hearing aids affect your brain?

Other negative changes can also occur in the brain, and as a result, even after you put on hearing aids, processing sounds can be a challenge. If you let the hearing loss go untreated for too long, the auditory parts of the brain may be reassigned to other functions.

Can hearing aids affect your brain?

Other negative changes can also occur in the brain, and as a result, even after you put on hearing aids, processing sounds can be a challenge. If you let the hearing loss go untreated for too long, the auditory parts of the brain may be reassigned to other functions. Several scientific studies have found that hearing aids keep the brain fit and can protect against cognitive decline. For example, people who use hearing aids for age-related hearing problems (age-related hearing loss) maintain better brain function over time than people who don't use them.

Hearing Loss May Put You at Risk for Depression, Cognitive Impairment, Isolation, and Anxiety. However, these problems can be alleviated by regular use of hearing aids when they are prescribed for hearing loss. Hearing aids can help restore communication function and improve auditory memory and communication ability. Experts agree that it is necessary to exercise the brain to maintain healthy brain function.

This means keeping your brain alert by keeping up with your hobbies, doing daily crossword puzzles in the LA Times and playing mind games. If you have hearing loss, simply wearing hearing aids can work wonders for how your brain works. To learn more about current hearing aids or to schedule an appointment with an expert audiologist, call The House Institute Hearing Aids Centers today. Studies show that proper use of hearing aids can reduce risk factor for dementia.

In fact, one study** documented hearing loss and cognitive impairment in a group of nearly 4,000 volunteers over a 25-year period. What the researchers found was interesting that people with hearing loss who did not wear hearing aids had a higher risk of developing dementia and depression. However, people with hearing loss who did use hearing aids experienced cognitive decline at a similar rate as people without hearing loss. When memory loss is related to hearing function, it can usually be resolved quickly and easily.

By using hearing aids, for example, you can improve your hearing function. This avoids cognitive overload, since the brain no longer needs to work hard simply to pick up and interpret sounds. This allows the brain to process information normally and means that the information is stored in memory, ready to be retrieved when needed. In addition to this, the use of hearing aids greatly reduces the risk of social isolation.

As you can continue your usual lifestyle while wearing hearing aids, people can stay social and active. Similarly, hearing aids mitigate the effects of hearing loss, which means that the risk of developing depression and anxiety is reduced. This ensures that your brain is not subject to structural changes that may occur over time due to isolation, reduced activity and depression. As you are able to maintain your lifestyle, your memory, function, and brain continue to exercise.

Because of this, your ability to interpret, store and retrieve information is not affected. A hearing test and proper treatment can certainly help combat hearing related memory loss. However, it is not necessary to wait until you begin to experience a reduction in memory function to consult a hearing care professional. By having regular auditory function tests, any potential hearing problems can be identified and resolved quickly, thus reducing the risk of related memory loss.

To learn more, take the Signia hearing test now and find out if you might be experiencing hearing loss. One factor that could explain the links between hearing loss and cognition is the fact that sound processing and cognitive processing occur in the same areas of the brain. According to research, people with hearing loss were twice as likely to develop cognitive impairment compared to people with normal hearing. That's why most doctors and hearing centers include a trial period, so you can be sure that the type you've chosen, whether it's a miniature behind-the-ear model or one that fits your ear, is right for you.

The sooner you address the symptoms of hearing loss, the more likely you are to avoid irreversible damage. Hearing loss also affects cognition and can lead to cognitive impairment and even dementia or an earlier onset of dementia. Several barriers prevent more widespread use of hearing aids, namely their high cost and the fact that many people find it difficult to adapt to wearing them. You may experience anxiety and stress when you can't hear a phone, a siren, an alarm, an emergency call for help, or have someone approach you.

According to the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association, people with hearing loss often isolate themselves from others to avoid stressful situations where they can't hear well. The research team has used several cognitive and behavioral tests to assess participants' memory and hearing. Hearing loss can interfere with cognitive abilities because a lot of brain effort goes into understanding speech, according to lead researcher Dr. At the end of the six months, participants showed improved memory, improved neural speech processing, and greater ease of hearing as a result of using the hearing aid.

People with hearing loss find it difficult to communicate, which can lead to stress, social isolation and depression. More than 35 million Americans suffer from hearing loss and some are unaware of their condition, others are postponing the appointment. . .

Brittney Weekly
Brittney Weekly

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