Can hearing aids cause headaches?

As you go from being unable to hear sounds clearly to being able to hear sounds around you with the help of hearing aids, you may experience some headaches. Why do hearing aids cause headaches? When you have hearing loss, your hearing system and brain don't get as much stimulation as they used to when you had normal hearing.

Can hearing aids cause headaches?

As you go from being unable to hear sounds clearly to being able to hear sounds around you with the help of hearing aids, you may experience some headaches. Why do hearing aids cause headaches? When you have hearing loss, your hearing system and brain don't get as much stimulation as they used to when you had normal hearing. Essentially, with a hearing loss, the auditory nerve and brain don't get enough exercise. So, when you put on hearing aids for the first time, you suddenly ask your brain to work much harder, because you hear more signals coming from your daily environment.

The brain needs to adapt to the acoustic environment provided by the hearing assistance device. Therefore, it is very common to experience dizziness and headaches when using the devices for the first time. To help the brain adapt more quickly to devices and ignore unnecessary background sounds and echoes, you should wear your new hearing aids as often as possible. Remember to take one-hour breaks when you have a headache or feel tired from wearing hearing aids.

Severe headaches are extremely rare, but not unheard of in patients with hearing loss. If they happen to you, they often last no more than a week. In relation to headaches, you are not the first to comment on this. In almost 45 years, it has been introduced to me several times.

In a previous post we asked how people treated this and there were some suggestions to try, but there were no solutions. You can ask the audiologist to carefully examine the contact points of the hearing aid to investigate if there is anything that may be causing pressure, and if so, try another type of hearing aid, earpiece, etc. It is known that the ear canal can be very sensitive for some people when objects are placed in the ears. I often place soft earplugs in an ear canal to determine if they have a similar effect.

If the hearing aid has a link that is placed over the ear, some people have an experience that sometimes occurs when they wear ill-fitting glasses. Glasses that are too narrow or tight create pressure on the temples, the bridge of the nose and above the ears, which can lead to frequent headaches. For those who are new to using hearing aids or who have just started using a new style of hearing aids, it's not uncommon to experience mild headaches for a few days. For some patients with hearing loss, hearing assistive devices fit so snugly that they forget to remove them when they enter the shower.

When hearing aids were muted or batteries removed, the patient did not experience headaches. With fine adjustments and small adjustments by your hearing aid specialist, you can be sure you'll get the most out of your devices comfortably. It may take a while to get used to hearing aids when you're new to them, but this is mainly because the brain needs to relearn how to filter out loud noises over and over again. However, if you suspect that you may have hearing loss or are experiencing other symptoms not listed here, please contact our office for a consultation.

There are many cases of hearing loss in which people lose the ability to hear a certain frequency. I have a different kind of pain caused by a Phonak hearing aid that gets caught between the tip of the temple of my glasses and my head, especially on the right side. That said, if you feel quite tired and you feel that your hearing aid is giving you a headache, try to limit the amount of time you wear it and increase it slowly. If the hearing aid is too loose or does not fit properly, this can lead to irritation and discomfort.

I've been having severe headaches but didn't associate them with the hearing aids until I removed them and didn't put them on for 2 days, no headaches. Whatever you do, don't take out the hearing aid or start scratching your inner ear, as it may cause you some damage. .

Brittney Weekly
Brittney Weekly

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