Can hearing aids cause headaches and dizziness?

The brain needs to adapt to the acoustic environment provided by the hearing assistance device. Therefore, it is very common to experience dizziness and headaches when using the devices for the first time.

Can hearing aids cause headaches and dizziness?

The brain needs to adapt to the acoustic environment provided by the hearing assistance device. Therefore, it is very common to experience dizziness and headaches when using the devices for the first time. As you go from being unable to hear sounds clearly to being able to hear sounds around you with the help of hearing aids, you may experience some headaches. According to AARP, if you have waited too long between the onset of hearing loss and acquiring hearing aids, the likelihood of headaches is higher.

Talk to your doctor about how to minimize headaches while your ears adjust to the new hearing exposure. Although vertigo can sometimes cause a loss of balance, hearing aids don't. In fact, a study by the university of washington found that treating hearing loss with 1 hearing aid can improve balance. Receiving additional hearing signals seemed to help participants maintain stability.

This evidence also suggests that older people, in particular, may benefit from a lower risk of falling associated with the use of hearing aids. So can hearing aids cause vertigo? The answer is that the hearing aids don't cause dizziness, twisting, or a feeling of phantom movement. Similarly, hearing aids don't create balance problems. Sometimes, when a customer is getting used to using hearing aids, especially for the first time, they may experience mild and minor headaches.

Some of the most common causes of dizziness are due to problems in the inner ear. A disturbance in blood circulation or fluid pressure in the inner ear can cause dizziness and tinnitus. For example, a severe cold can swell the inner ear and provoke episodes of dizziness. You may also experience dizziness if there is pressure on the nerves responsible for delivering balance information to the brain.

A behavioral hearing test in a sound booth may be followed by an auditory brainstem response test (ABR). If you feel dizzy with new hearing aids, you may want to meet with an audiologist to learn the root of the problem. You can avoid this side effect by consulting a hearing aid specialist and having your devices fit professionally. There are many cases of hearing loss in which people lose the ability to hear a certain frequency.

Vertigo with hearing aids may mean that you need to adjust the device or it may indicate more serious conditions. This digital technology also allows Steven Hale to adjust his hearing aids remotely, without the need for you to go to the clinic. But once you adjust to life with hearing aids and the vibrant listening experience they offer, you're likely to enjoy an improved social life, a new sense of confidence, and many other benefits. According to the AARP, pain in the ear canal can also be a sign that your hearing aids are not the right fit and may need to be adjusted.

If you find that hearing aids cause earwax to build up inside your ear canals, see your doctor to discuss solutions such as in-office earwax removal and over-the-counter solutions. Whatever you do, don't take out the hearing aid or start scratching your inner ear, as it may cause you some damage. Because balance and hearing are related and share a common pathway to the brain, there are many health problems that can cause dizziness and hearing loss, including severe allergies, bacterial or viral infections of the inner ear, medication side effects, and some circulatory conditions. As for dizziness caused by hearing aids, this is also rare, according to Samuel Bittel, AuD, a vestibular specialist and adjunct professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

In some cases, it may be because there is a problem with the way the hearing aids have been fitted or configured. People with tinnitus often have some type of hearing loss as well, but there is no evidence that tinnitus causes vertigo (although both are due to vestibular problems). .

Brittney Weekly
Brittney Weekly

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